Mullen Scorpio Cerilli is a financial service firm that is committed to excellence in meeting our clients' expectations for service and quality. We partner with our clients to find solutions to the needs and demands of their businesses. With an emphasis on planning and communication, we provide expert guidance for financial and tax matters to individuals, businesses and nonprofit organizations. We maintain a flexible and creative environment that encourages the success of our clients and ourselves.

The IRS is currently reviewing the important June 26 Supreme Court decision on the Defense of Marriage Act and will be revising the guidance in the near future.

For tax years 2010 through 2013, the maximum credit is 35 percent for small business employers and 25 percent for small tax-exempt employers such as charities.

If you pay $50,000 a year toward workers’ health care premiums – and if you qualify for a 15 percent credit, you save … $7,500. If you save $7,500 a year from tax year 2010 through 2013, that’s total savings of $30,000.

There is good news for small tax-exempt employers too. The credit is refundable, so even if you have no taxable income, you may be eligible to receive the credit as a refund so long as it does not exceed your income tax withholding and Medicare tax liability.

And finally, if you can benefit from the credit this year but forgot to claim it on your tax return there’s still time to file an amended return.

    File as soon as possible.  If you owe federal income tax, you should file and pay as soon as you can to minimize any penalty and interest charges. There is no penalty for filing a late return if you are due a refund.

    Penalties and interest may be due.  If you missed the April 15 deadline, you may have to pay penalties and interest. The IRS may charge penalties for late filing and for late payment. The law generally does not allow a waiver of interest charges. However, the IRS will consider a reduction of these penalties if you can show a reasonable cause for being late.

    Pay as much as you can.  If you owe tax but can’t pay it all at once, you should pay as much as you can when you file your tax return. Pay the remaining balance due as soon as possible to minimize penalties and interest charges.

    Installment Agreements are available.  If you need more time to pay your federal income taxes, you can request a payment agreement with the IRS.

    You can generally expect the IRS to issue your refund in less than 21 calendar days after we receive your tax return.

    Use this tool to check on the status of your refund. It provides the most up-to-date information the IRS has.

    You will need your Social Security Number, Filing Status, and Exact Refund Amount.

    https://sa2.www4.irs.gov/irfof/lang/en/irfofgetstatus.jsp

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